The Titanic Wreckage at 100: Never-Before-Seen Photos

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A team of scientists that took part in a 2010 expedition to its resting place revealed never-before-seen images of the Titanic in a Norfolk, Virginia, courtroom late last week. As part of a salvage case involving the wreck that is still heated more than 25 years after its discovery, the Norfolk judge had to don 3-D glasses to inspect the images, the highest-quality photographs ever captured of the ship. The images show Captain Smith’s bathtub and other items from the 100-year-old cruise liner, one of the most stunning technological achievements of the early 20th century, and they’re incredible.

Displayed below with some other photographs that capture the spirit of the RMS Titanic, the images shed new light — literally and figuratively — on the three-by-five-mile wreck site located more than two miles below the surface of the ocean. They were captured by a remote-controlled camera attached to a submersible vehicle. “The new images will ultimately be assembled for public viewing, scientists said,” according to theAtlanta Journal-Constitution, “and to help oceanographers and archaeologists explain the ship’s violent descent to the ocean bottom. It is also intended to provide answers on the state of the wreck, which scientists say is showing increasing signs of deterioration.” The submersibles captured every inch of what remains from the world’s most famous shipwreck using the latest technologies. “Individual images are stitched together in a mosaic process to create large-scale, almost panoramic views of the wreck,” the AJC explained.

read more :  Titanic: The Ship Magnificent.

This photo August 2010 provided by RMS Titanic Inc., shows CThe last davit remaining on the wreck of RMS Titanic. These lifeboat cranes were used to hoist the Ship’s wooden lifeboats over the side and into the water during Titanic‘s sinking. Many of the boats launched soon after the sinking were not close to full—passengers refused to believe the seriousness of the situation. Scientists were in court in Norfolk Va. revealing never-before-seen images of the Titanic and the ocean bottom where the violently strewn remnants of the world’s most famous shipwreck rest nearly a century after it sank on its maiden voyage. (AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.)

This photo August 2010 provided by RMS Titanic Inc., shows First Class Window: This photo taken at Titanic’s wreck site displays two windows from first-class cabins. The window on the left leads to Stateroom W, while the window on the right leads to Stateroom U Scientists were in court in Norfolk Va. revealing never-before-seen images of the Titanic and the ocean bottom where the violently strewn remnants of the world’s most famous shipwreck rest nearly a century after it sank on its maiden voyage. (AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.)

This August 2010 photo provided by RMS Titanic Inc., shows the port side of the bow section. The rip in the hull can be seen clearly at right, with the stern coming to rest several thousand feet away. The small rectangular windows admit light into Titanic’s famous suites, while the square windows on the left mark the “Private Promenade” reserved for exclusive use of those booking the best shipboard accommodations in the world. Scientists were in court in Norfolk Va. revealing never-before-seen images of the Titanic and the ocean bottom where the violently strewn remnants of the world’s most famous shipwreck rest nearly a century after it sank on its maiden voyage. (AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.)


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